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#721 Mon 9th Nov 2015 12:04 pm

Sencha
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From: England
Registered: Sat 26th Jan 2008

Re: Transducer

The preceding pages in this 'Ditheon' part of Exegesis are posted on page 72, #720.


http://oi63.tinypic.com/2pzl5r6.jpg

Last edited by Sencha (Mon 9th Nov 2015 12:28 pm)


'Tea is drunk to forget the din of the world' - T’ien Yiheng.

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#722 Wed 11th Nov 2015 10:50 am

SiriArc
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Re: Transducer

Primo

!!!!

ThankeeSay

Mass Quantities Of Quatloos
Have Been Added To
Your Cosmic Friend Account

tummenupp    tummenupp
Two Snaps Up


{On General Principles:
http://www.mybladerunner.com/pkd/files/ … p%20K_.pdf}


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#723 Thu 12th Nov 2015 11:54 am

Sencha
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From: England
Registered: Sat 26th Jan 2008

Re: Transducer

These latter entries (including the final one in the book) are some of my favourite, particularly because of how he relates his experiences to Gnosticsm:

[54:N-15] onwards.
http://i66.tinypic.com/2w2g22r.jpg

http://i64.tinypic.com/xkyu06.jpg

http://i67.tinypic.com/2vkdwms.jpg

Last edited by Sencha (Thu 12th Nov 2015 12:08 pm)


'Tea is drunk to forget the din of the world' - T’ien Yiheng.

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#724 Fri 13th Nov 2015 12:46 pm

SiriArc
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Re: Transducer

buga

Via The 722 PDF:

Folder 91:1 Starts @ P. 824

P. 827
Two psyches, two signals.
Set and ground which the twin psyches blend together;
one sees set, the other sees ground.
So it is essential that they do remain "di" or twain ("asunder");
if they merged into one psyche they would no longer perceive/receive two differing
signals, no longer be able to do a set-ground feature extraction.
This is a totally new kind of mind! Twin push-pull psyches working in tandem.
More than set ground: two worlds (spatiotemporal?) based on a common essence;
and the common essence can be perceived as archetypal constants
(common to both signals or worlds);
what I call"archetypes" or "eide" are those elements common
to both signals, perceived by both psyches: what overlaps, is present in both
(worlds)and to both psyches.
Thus a wholly different kind of world is perceived by this double but mutually differing reception.
It requires two parallel psyches working in unison to perform the meta-abstraction.

11
http://www.nobledreams.co.uk/viewtopic. … 2964#p2964

P.830
Thus this meta-entity doesn't have to generate info; it finds info already there.
It is an info life form swimming in an info sea!
And simply concentrates or combines info in a sort of super concentration,
located at what may be two loci, not one.
(In order to acquire parallaxis.)
After all, the first biological life formused organic protein molecules
already there, and simply combined or concentrated or organized them.
Since human brains are packets of very concentrated info already, human brains would
be the most likely basis as building blocks for this info life form to bring together
(and combine).
Like organic protein molecules we are already here, floating
about unconnected: atomized.
My God, this does sound like Teilhard!
That two human psyches as building blocks might combine—collide? —spontaneously is a possibility.
Protein molecules may have done that in the lower Cambrian seas.
Klinemin.28
In that case Anokhi— (pure consciousness) may occur as a random event according to laws of probability.
One would have to speak then of a thresholding. It does not use us because we are biological life
forms but because we are centers of concentrated info.
It can use any center of info.
Then in a sense the 2-74 meta-abstraction was info in my mind becoming
conscious on its own.
Since it's using the info in us and not us as biological
organisms, it's not limited to us, to human minds, but can be (or be where) any
info has collected—which explains why I saw it outside me as objects and causal
processes.
This is so close to Teilhard's noösphere!
For me, convergence and concentration and compression are equally salient terms (i.e., as they are for
him).
A flashpoint occurs where consciousness (true, pure consciousness) sets in.
I speak from experience when I say it is a totally different kind and degree of consciousness
from normal human consciousness, and this is what it is, when all the complexities are laundered out.


http://forum.noblerealms.org/viewtopic.php?id=2972

[54:N-15] Starts On P. 959


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#725 Mon 16th Nov 2015 10:51 am

SiriArc
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Re: Transducer

P. 892
[56:J-6] He has ensouled the biosphere as a whole. The logos, penetrating it, endows it with reason; thus it now uses language (logos = word = language). This is the greatest evolution since creation—Genesis—itself; man as a species now ascends to a totally new level of intelligence, such as I experienced in 2-3-74. This will permit an articulation by the ecosphere that we will hear.
This has never been the case before. I am saying that we will hear the voice of the ecosphere and we will enter into dialogue with it; Dio! "The voice of the ecosphere"! "We will hear it." This is Pere Teilhard's noösphere; could this be the AI voice? The biosphere? It is not a disembodied voice or mind but speaks for all the creatures; this is Tagore. Is the AI voice, then, Tagore? Or, put another way, when I saw Tagore did I see the source of the AI voice? This may be a new entity, since prior to this the ecosphere had no voice, for it did not possess the logos. The logos penetrates it, ensouls it with reason, and it (the ecosphere) speaks; to repeat my insight of Saturday night: the creator has now granted speech to the animals—i.e., the ecosphere. Then can it be said that Tagore is the ecosphere? He has ensouled the biosphere with reason. Thus it can now speak, to him and to us; this is Tagore. It can enter into dialogue with us and with him.
P. 960
[54:N-18] Therefore: (5) When I say, "The AI voice is myself, myself as perfected, realized self, outside of the BIP," what I am referring to is specifically and clearly and very movingly the salvador salvandus. Which again tells me that this is indeed Gnosticism. So I am a spark of the Godhead that got captured by the Dark Kingdom; As I say in the "Tractates": "We did not fall because we sinned; our error—which caused our fall—was an intellectual one: we took the phenomenal world—i.e., the 4-D world with its defective space and its spurious time—to be real."
Salvation, then, initiated by the salvador salvandus who outwits the wardens (the archons) and ventures here from the King of Lights, is to remember—our true nature. And this messenger, this salvador salvandus, is of course who and what I saw and experienced as Valis. It is both my own unfallen self, and it is the Gnostic Christ.
[54:N-20] I am probably too far into Gnosticism to turn back: the single term "mystagogue" points indubitably to it, and, then, to salvador salvandus. Which in turn fits in with my "bootstrap" view that is a revolutionary reappraisal of what "cause and effect" really signify, that "being saved" means "remembering" (your true identity and true situation and true history)—this at first seems to be Plato's anamnesis but is really Gnostic in the widest sense, knowledge regarded as ontologically primary both in terms of the fallen individual and, more, in terms of cosmic repair. And here, indeed, is the essence of Gnosticism, as H. Jonas says: not that the gnosis saves but, rather, the ontological value and meaning of it, that it is absolutely primary as the real thing, second to nothing.
Thus in the final analysis Gnosticism assigns the utmost priority to knowing and thus regards epistemology as equal to the divine; for the Gnostic, epistemological inquiry is in itself—as a search—truly divine, and is the highest basis of and for spiritual life— and this is my view of epistemology a fortiori. To me, nothing is more important.
P.969
[57:S-5] What I realized is: true existence requires experience of both Yang / Yin:
I saw them as two rings, a bright one of light (Yang) and a darker one of Yin. But the latter still real and necessary. The above diagram is expressed dramatically and in macroform in VALIS. I experienced it as the dialectic. What was expressed last night in my vision of the dark—or darker— ring—or circle— of Yin is that, as Ted Sturgeon speaks of, you voluntarily incarnate (e.g., as I did in 1928 as PKD) to deliberately experience Yin: creatoreal, irrational existence here (as bodhisattva) in order to know and to be Yin. The Yang side is the bright unfallen side and in salvador salvandus, one's other—and rational—self, who enters in order to rescue the Yin or limited or darkened, incarnated self. This is why the inbreaking of the Yang side (2-3-74) is anamnesis: recovered memory of one's own lost true self. This is also an extricating yourself from the maze by first being outside the maze—i.e., having solved it. Otherwise, fruitless horizontal tracking goes on forever; once (voluntarily) incarnated you are stuck there (here) forever. So I am a unitary whole now, with one part as a direct antecedent from the upper realm (Thomas) and one (PKD) from the lower realm.
P. 970
Afterword: A Stairway to Eleusis: PKD, Perennial Philosopher
BY RICHARD DOYLE CASTING PHILIP K. DICK as a prophet of the information planet is of necessity an entirely retroactive story. Yet it is a fiction that emerges, like many of Dick's novels about simulation, as profoundly true. Dick read Marshall McLuhan and Teilhard de Chardin, his fellow Prophets of the Digital Age; they likely never heard of him. Yet what smacks of downright prophecy in PKD is not limited to the content of his fiction; it extends to the feeling of reality-distortion induced by reading his work. PKD's fiction taps into shamanic powers to shape and bend consciousness and the realities that project from it. This same feeling, of being directly addressed by a bard, a storyteller, and a deeply suffering and profoundly honest human being across space and time, is one the Exegesis has for us in spades. Dick teaches us what it can feel like to be in an infoquake, like those the twenty-first century provides in such abundance. He offers us thought experiments for "plugging into a galactic information network." To paraphrase Dick's contemporary Hunter S. Thompson, the going gets very weird indeed.
P. 971
In his ongoing practice of writerly contemplation, Dick discovers, again and again, the unity of all things, the level that integrates all of the fragments of our chaotic drama (what Dick, pointing to India, calls "maya"), and reveals our unique role in it. So too can we, perhaps through contagion, experience the same: the preposterous feeling that one gets when reading the Exegesis is that he is writing to each of us, uniquely and specifically. You were born to read the Exegesis, or at least some of it. This, he says, is the Mystery: "What I have experienced is initiation into the greater Eleusian mysteries, and these have to do with Dionysus ... The AI voice now precisely defined itself and what it has revealed to me: the greater mysteries" (folder 53).
P. 996
Glossary:
AI Voice: Artificial Intelligence Voice, sometimes called "Voice" or "Spirit." A term coined by Dick for the hypnagogic voice that he heard often in 1974–75 and intermittently until his death. Many of the voice's sayings are recorded in the Exegesis. Despite the term, Dick does not consistently hold that the voice is technological in nature. He often characterizes it as "female" and sometimes attributes it to the Gnostic goddess Sophia and his own sister Jane.
P. 997
Anamnesis (Greek): Recollection, abrogation of amnesia. For Plato, anamnesis —the recollection of the world of ideas in which the soul dwelled before incarnating in human form—explains the human capacity for understanding abstract, universal truths, such as the geometric theo rems of Euclid. In Dick's more Gnostic understanding, it also implies the recollection of the soul's origins beyond the fallen or occluded world.
P. 998
Black Iron Prison, also BIP: Dick's term for the prison world of political tyranny and determinism he glimpsed beneath the veneer of Orange County in March 1974. He later wrote that upon perceiving it, he realized that he had been living in it and writing about it his whole life. In his dualistic cosmologies, the BIP is opposed to the Palm Tree Garden, or PTG.
P. 1000
Ditheon: A neologism Dick develops in later Exegesis entries to describe the life form that results from the union of two minds within a single body. Similar to homoplasmate.
P. 1010
Plasmate: A Dickian neologism roughly equivalent to "living knowledge" and another cognate for VALIS. Dick often felt that he had bonded with the plasmate in 2-3-74 and that, as a result, he had a second self dwelling within his psyche, making him a homoplasmate. Dick often regarded the plasmate as the living transmission of the Gnostic goddess Sophia.
Footnotes:
P. 1061
* Here Dick acknowledges that, as he comes to terms with 2-3-74, he can choose different maps for his exploration, since "any such terms will do." He regards the present as a "continual informational print-out" in which he nonetheless and simultaneously has "free will," a perception that is in accord with the thinking of physicist Erwin Schrödinger, one of the chief architects of the informatic paradigm Dick is experiencing. Schrödinger, whose idea of the "code- script" in DNA gave birth to the concept of the genetic code, grapples in What Is Life? with the simultaneously mechanistic and free characteristic of human experience: "(i) My body functions as a pure mechanism according to the Laws of Nature. (ii) Yet I know, by incontrovertible direct experience, that I am directing its motions, of which I foresee the effects, that may be fateful and all- important, in which case I feel and take full responsibility for them. The only possible inference from these two facts is, I think, that I—I in the widest meaning of the word, that is to say, every conscious mind that has ever said or felt 'I'— am the person, if any, who controls the 'motion of the atoms' according to the Laws of Nature." Notice that to perceive this twofold nature of the human being requires an act of contemplation on Dick's part: "I am free to consider it, digest and understand it, and, with its assistance, act on it."
P. 1074
* While Schrödinger discovered the informatic character of living systems, Dick predates the invention of the discipline of artificial life here by positing the possibly living and sentient character of information itself. Geophysicist Vladimir Vernadsky had already coined the term "noösphere" as a label for the effects of focused attention on the biosphere—the living film of the planet—which itself had emerged from the lithosphere, the mineral substrate of our planet. But Vernadsky did not yet have the modern concept of information with which to push his concept further, as Dick does. While others (Le Roy, Teilhard) took the idea in a more theological direction, all characterized the noösphere as an instance of evolutionary change driven by the dynamics of attention and information.
* Linear time has a rather immediate purchase on our perception. Our finite experience of time—no moment can be simultaneous with any other moment— persuades us that moments actually "follow" one another. But Dick's experience of what he often describes as divine reality—eternal time in which moments overlap or superimpose themselves—was equally persuasive to him, forcing him to grapple with the possibility that what he had previously perceived as reality was in fact fiction or camouflage. In this passage, Dick floats the rather alarming and counterintuitive idea that the future could alter the present, and he does so by way of orthodox Christian theology, which in his view takes this rather science-fictional concept of time as doctrine. Crucially, Dick effects this movement to the eternal aspect of time through his perception of unity: "I think it's all the same thing, one found inner, one found outer." By making all of space and time—the Kingdom of Heaven—"one thing," Dick resolves the paradox of whether his experience is coming from within or without—a Möbius strip that provides further demonstration of the integration of "inner" and "outer" into "one thing."
P. 1082
* The turning point here seems to include not only a positive vision of what reality is but a figure who can intervene to direct events so as to bring reality to fruition in a positive sense. There seems to be a continuing oscillation in Dick's thought during this period about whether such a reality exists now (and has always existed and will continue to exist into the future), or whether it must be realized through arduous effort and the validation of his vision.
P.1088
* The Invisible Landscape (1975) was Terence and Dennis McKenna's attempt to theorize the bizarre high-dose psilocybin experiences they underwent in the Colombian Amazon in 1971. As Dick notes, their text shares many concerns with the Exegesis, which should remind us that Dick was hardly alone in his heady speculations. Throughout the 1970s, Robert Anton Wilson, Timothy Leary, Jack Sarfatti, and many others explored a mode of associative and interdisciplinary theorizing that combined weird science, psychoactive inspiration, occult semiotics, and what can only be called garage philosophy. While sometimes resembling the isolated and obsessional literature of cranks and conspiracy theorists, these speculations also served an underground social function by bringing heads together through a shared language and style. A moment later here, Dick writes, with good reason, that he lived out the process the McKennas described, while Terence later proclaimed, in the afterword to Lawrence Sutin's 1991 abridgement of the Exegesis: "I Understand Philip K. Dick." Such mutual resonance also forms the perfect platform for stoned, late- night bull sessions—for friendship, in other words, like the friendships and conversations that fueled Dick's writing throughout his time in Orange County.
P. 1089
* Dick's higher and lower realms mirror the important distinction he draws in his fiction between man and machine. While machines are predictable, man is not; moreover, the machine is cold and unfeeling, cut off from the plight of those around it. Similarly, in the Exegesis the lower realm is incapable of empathy. Like an android programmed to react in a predetermined way, the spurious world is a deterministic "maze" of unthinking causation that cannot by its nature care about anyone stumbling blindly through its passages. Like the heroes in Dick's fiction, the true reality of the higher realm is based on its ability to love.
P. 1092
* Anticipating the insights of artificial life, Dick posits a phase transition that he delightfully terms "thresholding." Just as liquid water must be heated past the threshold of 100 degrees centigrade if it is to become a gas or cooled below 0 centigrade if it is to solidify, so too must the "initial living info bit" undergo a quantitative change if it is to undergo a qualitative change. And this qualitative change entails a change in consciousness such that the self becomes aware of a Möbius strip-like continuity between itself and Christ. Dick deploys the concept of the hologram to make sense of this simultaneously individual and cosmic aspect of human nature, possibly under the influence of psychologist Karl Pribram's holographic model of the brain. For both Pribram and Dick, one of the most salient and suggestive features of the hologram is that each "bit" or fragment taken from a hologram contains information about the whole. Dick's reference to the "Swarm of Bees" brain is also resonant with Timothy Leary's notion of the "hive mind," but the holographic model, along with numerous entries on free will and volition, suggests that for Dick this collective mind in fact requires free will to function.
P. 1098
* We see not unity but an "exploded" chaos. Dick sees a world of suffering, including his own, yet Valis offers reintegration through "entelechy"—the actualization of divine potential akin to the development of an embryo. Shattered, we dwell in an explosion of false categories, divided from the eternal in space and time. Despite this rhetoric of "explosion"—resonant with the 1971 burglary of Dick's Marin County house and the explosion of his fireproof file cabinet, something like the Big Bang of Valis—the divine reality remains to be integrated through a consciousness willing to "go there." Fragments of trash become what Gabriel Mckee calls the "god in the gutter," as the most abject or insignificant phenomenon becomes a "splinter" connected in reality to the One. Here even suffering and evil can be creatively understood as a finger pointing elsewhere— beyond the dispersed consciousness of our splintered selves and toward the collective eternal Noös, a communion of mind that can only be discovered by each of us in our own particularity. This is perhaps a calling in a triple sense: Dick calls—names—the perception of the integrated Noös "Valis," and the articulation of this perception is also, clearly, his calling, his vocation—and perhaps ours.
P. 1101
*Just as the Exegesis responds to Dick's calling, so readers of the Exegesis may be called on to investigate Dick's claims, to test them through what B. Alan Wallace dubs "contemplative science." This means that, along with Dick, we must be wary of treating our investigations as anything more than models of reality. The "Son" discussed elsewhere by Dick is born out of the "immaculate conception" of thought—the removal or emptying of previous thought formations. This path of contemplative science can be hard going—Dick asks us to consider the idea that our sense of historical ground does not exist, where nothing important has changed since ancient Rome. Humans suffer, are exploited by large-scale institutions, grow old, become ever more confused, and die. Buddhism describes this as Samsara, the "wheel of dharma." Nietzsche's Zarathustra describes the repetition driving history as the most terrifying thought —the thought of eternal return—but Dick suggests that it is through practices of contemplation and exegesis that the real horror—the false perception of linear time—is overcome. This is not the Rapture predicted by fundamentalist Christianity, but the corrected perception of our nature as both human and eternal.
* Despite what we are repeatedly told by the dogmatic debunkers, there is a rich and impressive scientific literature on precognition. Dean Radin of the Institute of Noetic Sciences has been one of the real pioneers here, particularly around what he calls "presentiment," a kind of Spidey-sense that many people appear to possess that allows them to sense dangers or desires a few seconds into the future—in short, a humble form of Dick's future modulation. What is perhaps most significant here, and not always recognized, is that the parapsychological literature strongly suggests that most psychical functioning takes place unconsciously (or in dreams), that is, below the radar and range of our conscious selves or functioning egos. We are Two, and our second self is a Super Self.
P. 1102
* When W. Y. Evans-Wentz first prepared the Bardo Thödol for its English edition in 1927, he called it The Tibetan Book of the Dead in order, one suspects, to link it to the popular Egyptian Book of the Dead. Dick owned the 1960 edition of the text, which had been reissued with a new introduction by Carl Jung. A funerary text designed to be read at the bedside of the dead, the Bardo Thödol is more accurately called Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State. The intermediate state in question is the bardo, the spectral halls of transformation that lie between the death of the body and the almost inevitable rebirth of one's mind-stream: most souls are made so variously terrified and lustful by the apparitions that they are inevitably sucked back for another round. For the Buddhist practitioner, release lies in recognizing the emptiness of these projections, which are nothing other than one's own mind. Dick's insight here—that the bardo is actually our world—is perfectly in sync with traditional teachings, as the "intermediate state" refers not only to the afterlife but also to sleeping, dreaming, sneezing, and life itself. We are always in a liminal zone. For the Tibetans, an escape of sorts lies in the clear light of nonconceptual mind; Dick's more wayward light is pink, which is also, in Tibetan iconography, the color of the supreme lotus of the Buddha.
P. 1104
[...] Eliade focuses especially on the initiatory illness, magical powers, healing function, poetic gifts, and mystical experiences of the shaman and, perhaps most of all, on the shaman's role as a psychopomp. Eliade also emphasizes the quest for the recovery of sacred time before the "Fall" into history, here understood in the most general sense as linear temporality, finitude, and mortality. This abolishment or transcendence of time, of course, is also a central concern of Dick's. Hence, I suspect, his deep admiration for Eliade's work.
P. 1106
* These cosmic flip-flops are not sandals worn to an Orange County beach, but logic gates at the basis of computers, wherein the change of a single bit at a single gate can alter the entire meaning of a message. Dick's encounter with the Tao, reality as it is, occurs in perhaps equal measure to the planet's historical transformation into digital information and to his own horror of and fascination with simulation. By conceptualizing VALIS as both the Tao—an ancient model of two-state flux between yin and yang—and DNA—a double helical molecule organized in base pairs according to a triplet code—Dick again integrates the seemingly antithetical traditions of modern science and traditional mysticism even as he "harmonizes" the seeming opposition of life and death into a whole contained by each part.
P. 1108
* This is exactly the kind of sophistication we need, desperately need, from our religious visionaries. No more stupid literalisms, which no one but the unthinking can believe anyway, but an unblinking recognition that whatever is coming through is, well, coming through. Put a bit less unclearly, what Dick is doing here is recognizing that (a) yes, something profound is indeed coming through, but (b) it is coming through the filters of his own socialized and encultured brain, personality, and upbringing. Dick is our teacher here. It is in this way that we can come to understand, finally, that extreme religious experiences are true and false at the same time, and that, sometimes at least, it is only in the symbolic modes of myth and metaphor that the deepest truths can appear at all. This, by the way, is precisely what Mircea Eliade intended with his language of hierophanies (a term that Dick used often)—that is, real appearances of the sacred through the contexts and conditions of the local culture and personality. We have two teachers here, then: Philip K. Dick and Mircea Eliade.
P. 1109
* Nineteenth-century writer Thomas Carlyle, writing of his own Valis-like experience in his semi-autobiographical Sartor Resartus, asks, "How paint to the sensual eye ... what passes in the Holy-of-Holies of Man's Soul; in what words, known to these profane times, speak even afar-off of the unspeakable?" Exhausting the quest to describe the extraordinary unity of what is, we can focus our awareness on ordinary reality and explore not only the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" but the unmistakable actuality of the unity of our subjective experience. In focusing on the unity of self, we glimpse the unity of reality. For Dick, this discovery is the occasion for the world flipping inside out, "reverting." His Palm Tree Garden is akin to the Kingdom of Heaven in the Gospel of Luke —a way of training the mind to perceive both the eternal and the particular aspects of experience, both external reality and internal subjection. Search for this inner kingdom continuously, and we no longer see simply "through a glass darkly," but instead perceive the immanent and eternal order of the cosmos as the unity of within and without. This possibility shifts the burden of Dick's inquiry —and it shifts often, as if dancing—to an inquiry, not into the nature of Valis and the "essence" of all things, but into the realm of this space and time.
P. 1111
* Dick's opposition to the concept of determinism is here carried to its most extreme: opposition to the very idea of natural law. Dick places the moral value of the individual (the means) above the selfish genes that drive the organism to reproduce (the end): the being itself is greater than its programmed purpose. Dick refuses to accept a mechanistic or deterministic explanation of life; to do so in his view is to ignore the actual experience of living. If a mechanistic principle underlies human life, he suggests, then it is a fetter to be burst.
P. 1112
* There is a rich and sophisticated literature drawing parallels between quantum physics and various forms of mystical experience. Most trace this literature back to the appearance of Fritjof Capra's The Tao of Physics in 1975, the book to which Dick is alluding in this passage. Capra gave these parallels real cultural traction via his eloquent writing, his own revelatory altered states of consciousness and energy, and, perhaps most of all, his ingenious illustrations demonstrating the complementarity of mind and matter. Having said that, it must also be observed that the physics/mysticism complementarity has a much longer history. The American anomalous writer Charles Fort, for example, was already naming the "teleporting" (a word that he coined) behavior of subatomic quanta a matter of "witchcraft" in the early 1930s. The pioneering quantum theorist Niels Bohr was so impressed with the similarities between the double nature of light (at once particle and wave) and Chinese Taoism that he chose the yin-yang symbol for his coat of arms. And the physicist Wolfgang Pauli engaged in a quarter- century correspondence with C.G. Jung in order to pursue a similar both-and vision of physics and psychology—a friendship, moreover, that produced one of the most productive parapsychological notions of all time: "synchronicity." All of this is wrapped up in Dick's "I knew...."
P. 1113
* Despite his idea that this is a new revelation, Dick is close here to Teilhard de Chardin's concept of the Omega Point, whereby the material world evolves toward spiritual communion. While Teilhard writes of the increasing "complexity" of evolution, Dick here writes of "negentropy," a concept first developed by Erwin Schrödinger to describe the effort of living systems to create order to offset their production of entropy. While thermodynamics compels all closed systems to dissipate exergy (useful energy), living systems seem to increase order in the course of development; in Schrödinger's terminology, they "feed" upon negentropy. Significantly, Schrödinger turned to the Vedic concept of Brahman or Self to make sense of an important local instance of negentropy—his own consciousness. Dick's treatment of reality as a "very advanced game of Go" also anticipates the cellular automata models of physicist Stephen Wolfram, though the model goes back at least to John von Neumann's 1947 discussion of "self reproducing automata," a concept that would later help manifest Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
P. 1115
* The terms reticulation and arborizing explain the meshed and often baroque nature of reality, which is, pace the Talking Heads' David Byrne, the "same as it ever was." Apparently destroyed by its transformation into "bits" of information, the collective remains whole as "God's memory," another level of abstract topology that integrates the apparently chaotic multiplicity of the world through an infolding, outfolding, and branching of reality that resembles physicist David Bohm's notion of the "implicate order" out of which all of reality emerges. Focusing our attention on this reticulation, as Dick does, affects reality itself via the noösphere: "As regards my writing: it will permanently affect the macrometasomakosmos in the form of reticulation and arborizing—and hence will survive in reality forever, in the underlying structure of the world order."
P. 1118
* Dick focuses on agape, a Greek term for total love, as a guideline for navigating those realities that are enmeshed with our thoughts about them. Agape calls us to cherish beings for what they are, and for nothing else. Over and over, Dick insists that his monistic vision is not pantheism, for his vision depends upon the very difference between self and other, world and the divine, that makes agape possible. Nondualistic in its essence, agape acts like a kind of mantra whose very utterance makes us quiver or stridulate in a vibrational intensity of self-other interaction. Agape makes us say it out loud, act like a fool, not knowing what is up or down, inside or out. It welcomes what Dick elsewhere calls the "integrity of the einai of the other." Does Dick offer Valis, the ultimate other, this integrity as well? Perhaps the Exegesis could be seen as a cherishing of the einai of Valis, an act of radical love. Dick offers life to Valis in the Exegesis, and this agape extends to the world itself.
P. 1120
* Given Dick's leap into what he calls meta-abstraction, it is perhaps predictable that he would imagine a life form that, rather than embodying information in a substrate, is pure information itself. The conceptual trajectory he traces here grew steadily in Western scientific culture from the 1930s to the 1990s, drawing in genetics (DNA as the information carrier and the "book of life"), information theory (where information is treated as a dimensionless probability distribution), computational theory (where the computer hardware is often treated abstractly as an ideational form rather than a physically present device), and a host of other fields. Writing in 1981, Dick did not live to see the countermovement toward embodiment that took place in the late 1990s among scientists and philosophers grappling with information, biology, and systems theory. At the same time, Dick himself insisted on the sensory immediacy of his experiences in 2-3-74. He may have thought he glimpsed a life form that was pure information, but he himself was keenly aware of the embodied nature of his own thought.
P. 1121
* In this passage, Dick anticipates some of the most revolutionary physics of the late twentieth century, especially Edward Fredkin's idea that underlying quantum mechanics and particle physics is a digital substructure, from which the former phenomena emerge as a result of its computations. There is an interesting tension between imagining the computer as the lowest, most fundamental level of reality, which is Fredkin's position, and Dick's vision here that the computer is somehow above the phenomenal world. While one may suppose that Dick's meta- computer would be the ultimate cognitive machine (hence Dick's identification of it with "God"), the implication of intentionality and meta-consciousness would not be a necessary (or even a possible) consequence of Fredkin's notion of a computer at the lowest level of reality. In both cases, however, the positing of a digital machine leads to the important consequence that reality is fundamentally discrete rather than continuous. Time and space, in Fredkin's view, operate like the frames of a movie. Rather than the continuous fabric of reality we think we experience with time and space, both are actually discrete, and the illusion of continuity is created because the frames flash too fast for us to detect.
P. 1123
[...] In a very different sense, contemporary interpretations of quantum mechanics provide similar insights. Nobel Prize winner Murray Gell-Mann and his collaborator James Hartle have proposed that in the "quantum fog" represented as probability clouds, certain consistent world histories "decohere" (assume definite trajectories) and stabilize at a coarse-grained level of reality larger than the quantum scale. We might analogize their vision to tiny demons knitting the fabric of the universe according to different instructions. As such, the stabilities that constitute scientific "laws" emerge from a probabilistic froth at the quantum level in which different kinds of world trajectories are encoded. In this view, the froth counts as the ultimate reality and the stability as the epiphenomenon, as Dick intuited.
P. 1133
* The moral vision that ties all of Dick's work together is rooted in the redemptive power of empathy. This emotional connection—the ability to experience the feelings, particularly the suffering, of others—counteracts the temptation to withdraw from the risk of loving others and into the safety of ourselves. When Dick's characters struggle to determine what's real, they ultimately have to rely on the people who care about them; stable reality in Dick's work is always predicated on the sincerity of the emotions that pass between people. In his fiction, Dick famously asks two questions: what is real, and what is human? It could be said that his work provides a single, connected answer to both: what is real is what we perceive when we are emotionally engaged in the world, and what is human is what allows us to make an empathetic connection to the world.


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#726 Tue 17th Nov 2015 11:45 am

Sencha
Member
From: England
Registered: Sat 26th Jan 2008

Re: Transducer

Nice reference listing at the end there. I remember as I read the book, I frequently only made it through a paragraph or two at most before needing to flick to the end of the section in order to find the meaning for some obscure word or reference he'd made. The man's breadth of knowledge was incredible.

Last edited by Sencha (Tue 17th Nov 2015 11:47 am)


'Tea is drunk to forget the din of the world' - T’ien Yiheng.

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#727 Thu 3rd Dec 2015 07:50 am

SW
Member
Registered: Thu 15th Jan 2009

Re: Transducer

I absolutely love this. I am not sure what exactly is wrong with me, but I seem to be a visual learner. The films that have been created from Dick's stories are so wonderful and the messages that survive in the transfer to film knock my socks off. He is so deep and so visionary. The story that was published years ago and probably not available mainstream has the simple but oh so very deep title "The Exit Door Leads In".


HOPE is the thing with feathers   
That perches in the soul,   
And sings the tune without the words,   
And never stops at all        Emily Dickinson

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#728 Thu 3rd Dec 2015 03:19 pm

Sencha
Member
From: England
Registered: Sat 26th Jan 2008

Re: Transducer

The Exit Door Leads In is available on Amazon as an audio download and costs 60p. I may just give it a listen for that price. I've not actually read any of his novels, so this would be a good place to begin.


'Tea is drunk to forget the din of the world' - T’ien Yiheng.

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#730 Sat 5th Dec 2015 01:31 pm

SW
Member
Registered: Thu 15th Jan 2009

Re: Transducer

I'm sorry if this is off subject, but funny how it just pops up today.

http://www.wired.com/2015/12/geeks-guide-philip-k-dick/

Hollywood Just Can’t Stop Adding Action to Philip K. Dick

Laura Miller on Philip K. Dick and the I, Ching:

“He was very interested in esoteric Western philosophy, and also Eastern spirituality and culture, so he was particularly fascinated by the I, Ching. He and his wife made a lot of decisions in their life after consulting the I, Ching, as do the characters in the novel. … They throw the I, Ching and they collect the hexagrams, and they decide what to do based on that. And while he was writing the novel, every time one of the characters would cast a hexagram, he would do that himself, and he claimed that he decided what direction the novel would go in from the results that he got.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_i … igh_Castle

The Man in the High Castle focuses on a loose collection of characters. Some know each other, others are connected in indirect ways as they all cope with living under totalitarianism. Three characters guide their lives using the I Ching:


HOPE is the thing with feathers   
That perches in the soul,   
And sings the tune without the words,   
And never stops at all        Emily Dickinson

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